- original tunes, scores and lyrics -
- Please use your device in landscape view, for optimal viewing -

Native American Spirituality and Music

Native American's understood the interdependence between people and other forms of life and made it a significant aspect of their culture. Although many Native people believed in a single creative force; rather than being given 'dominion' over all other creatures—the animals, plants and minerals were all considered companions of mankind to learn from and live with.

Is our world headed toward an ecological disaster? Climate change deniers and the recent “political reorientation” towards resource exploitation rather than conservation has been troubling.

As Americans, we ALL have a lot to learn from our indigenous First Nations' coexistence and reverence for nature. Sadly there have been too many milestones in our country's history that has blatantly ignored and negated this reverence. A simple walk in the woods or a moment of peaceful reflection while watching a sunset over a desolate ocean beach can help each one of us rekindle the spiritual connection with nature.

One With The Land is an original song that encapsulates this philosophy. The pages below were compiled as "companions" to this song.
~ rich coffey - autumn 2017

Spirituality

Learn about Native American spiritual beliefs on maintaining harmony with the earth. Read about Chief Seattle's impassioned response to the U.S. government’s land grab. Native American Spirituality

Music

Details on Native American drums and wooden flutes. Includes a link to a lesson on frame drumming! Native American Music

U.S. History - How the West was Lost

How the West was Lost was a Discovery Channel documentary series that documented how the west was overrun by white settlers during latter half of the 19th Century. The U.S. government's complicity in the myriad of deceptions and tragedies was truly staggering. Written from the perspective of the Native American, it unveils an horrendous side of American History that is conveniently neglected by our culture of global "moral superiority ."

The music was written by Peter Kater and the frequent sound of R. Carlos Nakai on the Native American flute thoughtout adds a well-needed poignancy to the presentation.